Asian long-horned beetles are a threat to New York's woodlands.

Invasive Pests

What is an Invasive Species?

Invasive species are non-native species that can cause harm to the environment, the economy or to human health. Invasives come from all around the world. As international trade increases, so does the rate of invasive species introductions. Invasive species are one of the greatest threats to New York's biodiversity. They cause or contribute to: habitat degradation and loss; the loss of native fish, wildlife and tree species; the loss of recreational opportunities and income; and crop damage and diseases in humans and livestock ( from the New York Dept. of Environmental Conservation).

bed bug 
Cimex lectularius

Bed Bugs

Bed Bugs are small insects that can inhabit bedrooms and hotel rooms. They feed on blood and their bites can cause a rash. Learn how to identify and manage them, here.

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Adult emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, 1888

Emerald Ash Borer

Learn how to identify the Emerald Ash Borer, monitor your Ash trees, detect and report possible EAB in your trees, and more, with resources we've compiled on this site.

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Hemlock woolly adelgid  (Adelges tsugae) -adult

Hemlock Pest

The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid lives and feeds on hemlock trees. Infested trees can die within 2 years, although 10-12 years is more common.

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Brown Marmorated Stink Bug on leaf

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is native to Asia, and was first detected in Pennsylvania in 2001. It produces an unpleasant smell indoors, and can damage shade and fruit trees, vegetables and legumes.

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Asian longhorned beetle (male)

Asian Longhorned Beetle

First found in New York in 1996, the Asian Longhorned Beetle is a serious threat to our maples and other hardwood trees.

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boxelder bug 
Boisea trivittata

Boxelder Bugs

Boxelder Bugs (Boisea trivittata) are nuisance pests. Their feces can stain light colored surfaces and smashing them can also release an unpleasant odor. Learn how to identify and manage them, here.

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Contact

Sue Gwise
Horticulture and Natural Resouces Educator
Sjg42@cornell.edu
315-788-8450 ext. 243

Last updated June 20, 2017